Urinary bladder dysfunction - surgical technique influences detrusor muscle activity (cystometry in rat model)

  • Kajetan Juszczak Dept. of Urology, Memorial Rydygier Hospital
  • Przemyslaw Adamczyk Department of General and Oncological Urology, Nicolaus Copernicus Hospital, Torun, Poland
  • Piotr Maciukiewicz Department of Urology, Memorial Rydygier Hospital, Cracow, Poland
  • Tomasz Drewa Department of General and Oncologic Urology, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz, Poland / Department of General and Oncological Urology, Nicolaus Copernicus Hospital, Torun, Poland

Abstract

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a big challenge in functional urology. Constant search for new agents in OAB therapy in rats is ongoing. The key to correct evaluation of the effects of the tested drugs on urinary bladder is good cystometry. To avoid the artefacts during cystometry the surgical technique is critical in this field. The aims of the study were to evaluate the effects of the way of catheter implantation into urinary bladder and the recovery time after surgical procedure on urinary bladder activity. The results have shown that the best method is to insert the catheter at the top of the urinary bladder, as compared do anterior or posterior wall. Implantation at the top provide optimal detrusor muscle activity. The storage phase is characterized by low intravesical pressures during filling, good sensation, good compliance and easy generation of detrusor muscle contraction initiating voiding. Too early start of urodynamic testing results in incorrect entries of cystometrograms and the lack of normal activity of the urinary bladder. The optimal time for cystometry is about 1 hour after surgery. In conclusion the meticulous catheter implantation and resting time are the keys for good cystometry in animal model.

Published
2017-10-07
How to Cite
JUSZCZAK, Kajetan et al. Urinary bladder dysfunction - surgical technique influences detrusor muscle activity (cystometry in rat model). Current Science, [S.l.], v. 113, n. Issue 6, oct. 2017. ISSN 0011-3891. Available at: <http://currentscience.org/index.php/CS/article/view/33>. Date accessed: 15 dec. 2017.